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Accessibility guide Parliament Budapest

April, 2020

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In this comprehensive guide of the accessible Parliament in Budapest, we explain everything you need to know before visiting this impressive building. Read about the Parliament and its history, the accessibility of the complex, how to get there, ticket information, and more.

About the Parliament in Budapest

The Houses of Parliament of Hungary attracts many visitors every year. It is one of the busiest and best-rated tourist attractions in Europe and a great example of Gothic architecture. Inside the building, you find offices, chambers, a post office, and even a library. It is so much more than just a museum, which makes it a true must-visit.

parliament budapest surroundings
parliament budapest square

Structure

The Parliament has 691 rooms, 28 entrances, ten courtyards, and 29 staircases. During a tour of the building, you only see a few important ones, like the Chamber of Peers and the Lounge of the Chamber of Peers. Moreover, you see the Dome Hall and the Grand Staircase.

The Chamber of Peers’ correct name is the former Chamber of Peers. Nowadays, used for meetings and conferences. The next room you enter is the Lounge of the Chamber of Peers. A part of the complex that is filled with Hungarian art. The Dome Hall is the center of the Parliament and the symbolic center of Hungary. This hall is where you find the oldest coronation regalia in Europe. Finally, the Grand Staircase is described as the most breathtaking part of the building. This covered in splendor staircase leads from the main entrance to the Dome Hall. Your eyes feast on the excessive amount of majestic decoration surrounding you while you walk over the red carpet.

The Holy Crown

The Holy Crown, found in the Parliament, is one of two Byzantine crowns left in existence. You can also view the other one in Budapest, in the Hungarian National Museum. The Holy Crown of Hungary is displayed in the central Dome Hall of the Parliament and guarded by two guards consistently. It is a beautiful object formed from gold and decorated with pearls and gemstones. A real piece of art. For over 800 years, Hungarian kings were crowned with this unique piece of tradition.

Symbolism

The architect’s goal was to include multiple symbolic facts in the design of the building. And so, it happened. Throughout the building, you find 365 towers. Each one symbolizes a day of the year. Besides that, the number 96 is significant. The height of the dome of the main building is 96 meters, and the main staircase has 96 steps. 96 represents the year 896, which is the year of the settlement of Hungary.

Construction

Like several other buildings in Budapest, the Parliament building was built in honor of Hungary’s millennial anniversary. In 1880 a competition was held, that Imre Steindl won. For his design, the architect was inspired by the Parliament Building in London. His vision was also that the building should be made with as many Hungarian building materials as possible and with the help of local artisans and producers. The construction of the parliament building took no less than 17 years and was finally completed in 1902. Just a little too late for the celebration of the jubilee of Hungary.

Surroundings

You find the main facade of the Parliament facing the Danube river. However, that is not the official main entrance nowadays. That gate is located on Kossuth Lajos Square. In that Square, you find an impressive memorial to the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. This revolution consisted of the nation’s standing up against the communist regime in the country at the time. Besides this memorial, you also find statues of the Hungarian leader Francis II Rákóczi and the poet Attila József in the surrounding areas of the Parliament. Every day at 12:30 p.m., the changing of the guard ceremony takes place in the Kossuth Lajos Square. When visiting the Parliament, this tradition is a must-see as well.

parliament budapest inside
parliament budapest guards
parliament budapest pillar

Accessibility of the Parliament building in Budapest

The accessible parliament in Budapest is fully wheelchair accessible, and there is also a wheelchair service if necessary. Another option you have is to rent wheelchairs through us. Click here for more information about our equipment rentals. Throughout the parliament you find wheelchair accessible bathrooms. You find these by following the signates.

The surface everywhere in the building is carpet, which is easy to maneuver on. Besides that, there are elevators inside the building to avoid the stairs. The House of Parliament requests visitors with a disability to send an e-mail before their arrival to let them know someone is coming who is disabled. This way, they can ensure a smooth visit. An employee guides you to one of the accessible entrances and closest elevator.

parliament budapest carpet
parliament budapest outside floor

Wheelchair Accessible Tours in Budapest

Are you interested in visiting this impressive building, or other breathtaking spots in accessible Budapest? Have a look at the accessible tours we offer by clicking on the button. Discover all the best places in this beautiful city together with us.

How to get there

The city of Budapest has tried to make public transport more accessible over the years. Kossuth Lajos tér is the closest metro and tram stop. These lines, however, are not yet fully accessible.

You can arrange private adapted transportation through us. Click on our transfers to find more information about this service. This way, you can be sure of your accessible transport.

The address of the Parliament is Kossuth tér 1-3, 1055 Budapest, Hungary.

Ticket information

There is only a limited amount of tickets available each day for a guided tour through the accessible Parliament in Budapest. Book your tickets in advance online to be able to ensure your visit. They recommended booking your tickets two weeks before your arrival.

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